Thank you for your interest in my online-study!

Perceptions of Sexual Attractiveness

This study seeks to identify how people differ in the ways they perceive and judge sexual attractiveness. The tasks consist in rank-ordering 32 pictures of attractive men or women (plus one additional person).

Tasks for Females with Heterosexual Orientation:

  • Rank-order attractive men according to perceived sexual attraction
  • Rank-order (other) attractive women according to your subjective view on sexual attractiveness in women.

Tasks for Males with Heterosexual Orientation:

  • Rank-order attractive women according to perceived sexual attraction
  • Rank-order (other) attractive men according to your subjective view on sexual attractiveness in men.

When the new window opens, please click on the Instructions button!

Credits:
The two sets of pictures used for this study were assembled by Roland Henss for his own online-experiments.

This online-study, which is also a demonstration example for the WebQ tool for q-sorting items online, is on the web since 1999, and hundreds of participants have taken this test so far. There is no results report available, I'm sorry. What I can say is that "tastes" are different! It's difficult, however, to assign participants neatly into groups with very similar preferences and dislikes, there is much idiosyncracy involved. It is also interesting to note that several participants reported that they were surprised finding out for the first time what types of men (or women) they find attractive.

Now I would like to set up a similar experiment with fresh pictures, not models this time, but pictures of everyday men and women. As I'm too lazy to find pictures myself I would like to invite you to send me a picture of yourself, if you don't mind to have your picture published this way. If you are interested please read more on the next page.


Related Research

If you are doing related research, I can put a link to your site here, especially if it is an online-study also. BTW, I'm interested in references to research on individual differences in senses or perceptions of attractiveness.


Peter Schmolck <p41bsmk@unibw-muenchen.de> 04-Jan-2006